Mounted Arm Bar

Transient

So, here's the thing... Professor Isaac's pressure game is so tight and so technical, I can't imagine how great I'll be once I really accept my training and devote the proper time. Today Isaac showed an arm bar from mount that sets up multiple chokes along the way. All with really, really impressive pressure the entire time. I felt super-strong and capable rolling today, it was really exciting to feel back in somewhat of a groove.

Mounted Arm Bar

Start mounted on your opponent. Use a same-side grip to open the lapel and feed four finger inside the collar, punching your fist to the ground to establish base. From here, scoop their chin with your elbow, pressuring down. This will likely make them use the opposing arm to fend off the choke. This will leave their shoulder open for you to slide your knee up and drape their arm into your collar grip and across their throat. Stay heavy on the elbow to keep them in place.

From this position, reach across their throat forming a mounted cross choke. You can end here if threatened, but understand this is a transitional movement as your base is compromised with both of your hands tied up. If you'd like to end, place your head on the mat before scooping the collar grip, drawing your elbows to your side and arching your back to pressure into their throat.

To keep going, lean forward, bringing your foot around into S Mount. Professor Isaac prefers the heel under the elbow, but stressed the ability to finish from either position. Your butt should be over your heel with all of your weight on their stomach – perpendicular to their body. Use your free hand to scoop the arm you draped across their throat at the elbow. You can grab your own lapel to secure leverage. Lean your head toward their feet as your high knee now inches around their head. Now fall back, pinching your knees – never crossing your feet. To prevent escape attempts, loop your lower hand under their closest knee and draw in the slack.

Transition to Mounted Arm Triangle

This was an incredible transition. In fact, it even worked on a guy with a cinderblock for a head. I'll post the details when I get a minute.

Brandon Knowlden